Archive for May, 2013

The Accomplishment Let-Down.

winToday is an odd sort of day with multiple feelings to share.  I graduated on Friday with my Masters of Science in Computer Information Systems from Missouri State University.  It was a day I had worked two years to reach.  To be honest, it was rather surreal by the time it came to walk across the stage and be hooded (with the MS hood).  I had family by my side and we spent the entire weekend together just enjoying the moment.  One thing everyone kept asking me was “how does it feel to be done?” or commenting “It must feel great to be done!” In reality, I don’t feel relief or an overwhelming sense of accomplishment – yet.  I’m sure it will come but is not that day.  Today I feel a little lost.

This is not a new roller coaster ride; I’ve sensed this before.  Other major accomplishments in my life have been met with the same build-up and excitement with the same sort of empty feeling afterwards.  I think it is because the goal is achieved and my question is “now what?”  I believe that this is a cycle that all leaders need to be aware of for ourselves and for our teams.  We each have goals (usually more than one) that we are working towards, with milestones along the way.  The idea is to achieve and to reach the end goal, but then what?  In some ways it can be a big let-down or an emotional crash after such an emotional high for major accomplishments.  We see the results of our achievements and we know what it took to get us to the goal line, but like running a race – what do you do after you cross the line? You celebrate the moment but you find the next race to run because that one is now over.

What I am learning about myself during this time of reflection is that I like to achieve, and I like to have goals.  The important thing is to find that next goal or next hill to climb and find it fast. Without my goals I feel a little out of place or out of focus and start to founder. At least for me, I need my challenges to keep my enthusiasm and energy level high.  I am all for taking time off or taking breaks to unwind or relax after a stressful time, but as driven and focused people, I think we thrive on moving forward instead of standing still.  I know I am looking for my next ‘project’ because it is important to keep going.  Friday was amazing and this past weekend with family was indescribable fun but it is over now.  On to the next great adventure!!

Lori Buresh

CEO, The Professional Development Team

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The Frustration of Politics.

   I believe politics, in this context organizational not legislative, boils down to a self-centered point of view.  First, I must clarify my definition of politics in this regard so we are all on the same page.  When I mention organizational politics, I mean that a group of people are struggling to communicate and therefore unable to achieve the overall goals for the company or group. Why is that? Because each person in the group has his or her own needs, wants and tasks to complete.  Everyone is ultimately looking out for his or her own priorities. While it is true that certain individuals are willing to put others’ needs first or sacrifice for the good of the team, the chances of having an entire team made up of such noble people is rather rare.  Enjoy it if you have that opportunity!

Many times when businesses talk about politics in their organizations, it implies someone (maybe someone in upper management) may get his or her feelings hurt or be effected personally by decisions or projects.  In order to avoid dealing with the consequences of hurt feelings or snubbed projects, leaders may have to tread lightly. So what does that mean and what happens to the rest of the team?

To be fair, when a leader is trying to be political in this context, is does not always translate to a bad thing. Political discussions may also equate to tactful discussions or mediating a problem for the benefit of everyone.  Political in that regard may actually be beneficial.  However, many times, people are so worried about being ‘politically correct’ that they are unable to accomplish goals.  Think about a time when you tried to please everyone in a group.  How well did that work out?  The truth is we all have different ideas, motivations and needs.  When leaders try to appease everyone, the outcome is rarely truly satisfying for the whole group.  In fact, I equate the effort of being politically correct with decision paralysis.  If leaders try so hard not to offend or upset anyone (like many legislative leaders try for votes) then how is it possible to get anything done?  I submit leaders are essentially stymied if they continue on this path. While we don’t have to be mean or cruel purposefully, leaders have to be ready to handle hurt feelings, conflict or rejection by others of their team.  On the flip side, leaders have to be ready with thicker skin and a higher vision when others approach your team with less than ideal options.  By using data, documentation, planning, a pragmatic view of the big picture, and above all – communication – I believe we can move past politics and get into accomplishment.

Lori Buresh

CEO, The Professional Development Team

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